Resilience is about bouncing back. The challenge is to prepare kids to have the capacity to recover before anything actually goes wrong.

Resources

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics website has information for parents of babies, children, teens, and young adults: www.healthychildren.org
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics publishes authoritative books to help parents understand and support healthy development through a child’s lifespan. These books can be previewed at www.healthychildren.org/bookstore

CHILD PLAY (AND ADULT PLAY)

  • Ginsburg KR and the Committee on Communications and the Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development and Maintaining Strong Parent- Child Bonds. Pediatrics 2007;119;182-191.  Available at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/119/1/182
  • Hallowell EM. The Childhood Roots of Adult Happiness: Five Steps to Help Kids Create and Sustain Lifelong Joy. New York, NY: Ballantine Books; 2002
  • Hirsh-Pasek K, Golinkoff RM, Eyer DE. Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn—and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Books; 2003
  • Brown, S. Play: How it shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul. New York, NY: Avery Press, Penguin Group; 2009
  • Elkind D. The Power of Play: Learning What Comes Naturally.  Berkeley, CA: Da Capo Press; 2007

ORGANIZATIONS COMMITTED TO BUILDING CHILD AND ADOLESCENT RESILIENCE

  • The Search Institute: The mission of The Search Institute is To provide leadership, knowledge, and resources to promote healthy children, youth, and communities.The Search Institute framework includes 40 Developmental Assets young people need to achieve their potential. To see a list of assets modified for each developmental level, go to  www.search-institute.org/assets
  • Communities That Care: Communities That Care is a system developed by J. David Hawkins and Richard F. Catalano that empowers communities to use advances from prevention science to guide their prevention efforts. The CTC Prevention Strategies Guide lists 56 tested and effective prevention programs and policies shown to increase protective factors, reduce risk factors, and reduce adolescent problem behaviors. Visit www.communitiesthatcare.net
  • Kids at Hope: Kids at Hope is committed to helping families and communities create an environment where all kids will thrive. Visit  www.kidsathope.org

RESILIENCE – PARENTING BOOKS

  • Mogel W. The Blessings of a B Minus: Using Jewish Teachings to Raise Resilient Teenagers, New York, NY :Scribner; 2010
  • Lerner RM. The Good Teen: Rescuing Adolescence from the Myths of the Storm and Stress Years.  New York, NY: Three Rivers Press; 2008.
  • Benson PL.  Sparks: How Parents Can Help Ignite the Hidden Strengths of Teenagers, San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2008.

RESILIENCE – HEALTHY, OPTIMISTIC, AND HOPEFUL THINKING

  • Seligman MEP, Reivich K, Jaycox L, Gillham J. The Optimistic Child: A Proven Program to Safeguard Children from Depression and Build Lifelong Resilience. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin; 1995
  • Reivich K, Shatté A. The Resilience Factor: 7 Essential Skills for Overcoming Life’s Inevitable Obstacles. New York, NY: Broadway Books; 2002

STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE AUTHENTIC SUCCESS

  • Challenge Success.  This organization is committed to championing a broader vision of success for youth.  Its mission statement follows: We believe that real success results from attention to the basic developmental needs of children and a valuing of different types of skills and abilities. In particular, we endorse a vision of success that emphasizes character, health, independence, connection, creativity, enthusiasm, and achievement. Accordingly, we have created Challenge Success with a mission to inform, inspire, and equip youth, parents, and schools to adopt practices that expand options for youth success. Website:  www.challengesuccess.org
  • Dweck C. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. New York, NY: Ballantine Books; 2007

OVERCOMING THE BARRIERS TO AUTHENTIC SUCCESS

  • Pope DC. Doing School: How We are Creating a Generation of Stressed-Out, Materialistic, and Miseducated Students.  New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; 2003.
  • Hirsh-Pasek K, Golinkoff RM, Eyer DE. Einstein Never Used Flash Cards: How Our Children Really Learn—and Why They Need to Play More and Memorize Less. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Books; 2003
  • Elkind D. The Hurried Child: Growing Up Too Fast Too Soon. 3rd ed. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishers; 2001
  • Levine M. The Price of Privilege: How Parental Pressure and Material Advantage are Creating a Generation of Disconnected and Unhappy Kids. New York, NY: Harper Paperbacks; 2008.

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

  • Goleman D. Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. London, England: Bloomsbury; 1996
  • Gottman JM, DeClaire J. The Heart of Parenting: Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster; 1997

 OVERCOMING PERFECTIONISM

  • Greenspon TS. What to Do When Good Enough Isn’t Good Enough: The Real Deal on Perfectionism: A Guide for Kids. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing; 2007

STRESS MANAGEMENT: PHYSICAL HEALTH

  • Ratey JJ with Hagerman E. Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain: Little, Brown and Company: 2008
  • Stricker PR. Sports Success RX!: Your Child’s Prescription for the Best Experience: How to Maximize Potential and Minimize Pressure.  Elk Grove, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; 2006.

STRESS MANAGEMENT: THE IMPORTANCE OF NUTRITION

TEEN DRIVING

The Website  www.teendriverssource.org  is produced by The Center for Injury Research and Prevention at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. It has separate sections for teens and parents.  It includes the site (http://parentingmyteendriver.org) which teaches parents how to apply authoritative parenting practices to teen driving.

ADOLESCENT PREVENTION AND CRISIS MANAGEMENT

  • Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) is dedicated to preventing destructive decisions, particularly underage drinking, other drug use, risky and impaired driving, teen violence, and teen suicide: www.sadd.org
  • The Covenant House Nineline is a national, 24-hour, toll-free hotline for kids and parents across the United States that addresses adolescent crises and homelessness. Counselors offer guidance and support can link callers to community services. Visit  www.nineline.org or call 800/999-9999.

DRUGS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES

  • The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign offers a site that offers far more than ideas to counter drug use:  www.theantidrug.com
  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers easy-to-read material for the public covering a wide range of alcohol-related topics. Visit  www.niaaa.nih.gov/Publications 
  • National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has materials  developed specifically for students and young adults  at http://nida.nih.gov/students.html
    More information about specific drugs is available at   http://nida.nih.gov/drugpages

RESOURCES FOR SEXUAL MINORITY YOUTH AND THEIR FAMILIES

  • Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) offers guidance and support if you believe that a young person you care for may be struggling with his or her sexual identity, or if he or she shares a homosexual or bisexual orientation with you, and you wish to learn how best to be supportive, Visit   www.pflag.org  or call 202/467-8180.

MEDIA LITERACY AND SAFETY

  • Strasburger VC, Wilson BJ. Children, Adolescents, and the Media. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications; 2002
  • The Center on Media and Child Health at Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard School of Public Health is dedicated to understanding and responding to the effects of media on the physical, mental, and social health of children through research, production, and education: www.cmch.tv

EXTREME CIRCUMSTANCES

  • ILLNESS, DEATH, AND GRIEF
    • The Journey of Hearts Web site offers information and links to a wide variety of resources and organizations that help children through loss, change, and grief. Visit www.journeyofhearts.org/jofh/grief/kids_res
    • Rauch PK and Muriel AC. Raising an Emotionally Healthy Child When a Parent is Sick.  New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Books; 2005
  • DIVORCE

REACHING FOR PROFESSIONAL HELP

It is ideal to ask your child’s pediatrician or other health care professional, school counselor, or clergyperson to help guide you to find a mental health professional that is the right match for your child and family. However, many mental health professional organizations offer online referral resources.

United States:

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
American Mental Health Counselors Association
American Psychiatric Nurses Association
American Psychological Association
American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy
National Association of Social Workers

Canada:

Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Canadian Association of Social Workers
Canadian Psychiatric Association
Canadian Psychological Association


The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry offers information for psychiatrists and families about developmental, behavioral, emotional, and mental disorders affecting children and adolescents:  www.aacap.org

The American Psychological Association Web site offers information for psychologists and families on a wide variety of mental health concerns. Visit  www.apa.org

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) offers free, easy to read brochures and fact sheets on mental health issues at  http://nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/index.shtml